Irish National Stud

Visitors - Attractions

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Latest News & Events

  • Charm shows fighting Spirit in Longchamp15/09/2014While Kingman has been carrying all before him in the mile division you could be forgiven for overlooking the exploits of Gr.1 Prix Jean Prat winner; Charm Spirit who tackled the Gr.1 Prix du Moulin de Longchamp on Sunday.

  • Jeremy15/09/2014Jeremy raced for Betty Moran, owner of Papillon. He was trained by Sir Michael Stoute who saddled him to win the Jersey Stakes and to come back the next year to the Queen Anne Stakes where he was beaten a short head.

  • Invincible Spirit Lands another Deauville Double!18/08/2014One year on from Invincible Spirit’s daughter Moonlight Cloud securing a unique double when winning both the Gr.1 Prix Maurice de Gheest and the Gr.1 Prix Jacques le Marois within 7 days of each other, Invincible’s progeny was once again on top at the highest level both on the racecourse and in the sales ring.

Europe's Finest Japanese Gardens

The Irish National Stud's Japanese Gardens, renowned throughout the world and the finest of their kind in Europe, are far more than simply a treat for the eye. They also provide comfort to the soul, achieving exactly the objective that was set out when the gardens were created between 1906 and 1910.

Devised by Colonel William Hall Walker, a wealthy Scotsman from a famous brewing family, the gardens were laid out by Japanese master horticulturist Tassa Eida and his son Minoru. Their aim was, through trees, plants, flowers, lawns, rocks and water, to symbolise the "Life of Man". That plan was executed to perfection and Eida's legacy is now admired by the 150,000 visitors who soak up the peace of the gardens every year.

Very much representative of Japanese gardens from the early 20th century, Eida's work traces the journey of a soul from oblivion to eternity and portrays the human experience of its embodiment as it journeys by paths of its own choice through life. Birth, childhood, marriage, parenthood, old age, death and the afterlife are all brought to mind as the gardens, a seamless mixture of Eastern and Western cultures, are explored.

Eida left Tully in 1912 with 34 years passing before the gardens gained their next supervisor, Patrick Doyle, who remained in charge until 1972, since when the gardens have continued to flourish and surge in popularity.

Among the most loved of all Ireland's gardens, the Irish National Stud's Japanese Gardens are a veritable feast for the eye and ear with the sight and sound of trickling streams perfectly complementing the greenery and vivid colours that provide a tranquil backdrop to the beautiful Bridge of Life and Tea House.

The Japanese Gardens are a place for contemplation, meditation and reflection. Since they were first enjoyed more than 100 years ago, they have never failed to please.