Irish National Stud

Visitors - Attractions

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Latest News & Events

  • Vintage Crop14/07/2014Vintage Crop, winner of the 1993 Melbourne Cup died Sunday July 13th. A glorious and pioneering racing career in the colours of Dr Michael Smurfit and under the expert guidance of DK Weld was followed by a long retirement at the Irish National Stud. John Osborne, CEO of the Irish National Stud said: Vintage Crop was a true equine celebrity, a horse who pioneered the concept of truly global competition when he travelled from the Curragh to Flemington to win the Melbourne Cup, the richest race in Australia. The scale of that achievement is revealed by the number of horses who have since tried and come up short. He was a great feature of our visitor experience here at The Irish National Stud, his story was told to hundreds of thousands, who saw him as a true warrior. He was lovingly cared for here by Annette Boland and Fiona Doggett and will be missed by us all.

  • Charmed Run for Invincible Spirit Colt at Chantilly!14/07/2014Charm Spirit brought Invincible Spirit’s Individual Group 1 Winners' tally to ten this afternoon when he took the Prix Jean Prat over a mile at Chantilly. Settled in fourth under Olivier Peslier for most of the contest the colt, who had previously finished fifth in the Gr.1 2000 Guineas and had won a Group 3 over course and distance last month, enjoyed a charmed run when the race began in earnest.

  • INS Graduates Celebrate their Independence!09/07/2014It was perhaps fitting that the 2014 Irish National Stud Thoroughbred Breeding and Management Course Graduation took place on the fourth of July; Independence Day as the 2014 graduates are now independent of the Irish National Stud and set to explore pastures new!

Europe's Finest Japanese Gardens

The Irish National Stud's Japanese Gardens, renowned throughout the world and the finest of their kind in Europe, are far more than simply a treat for the eye. They also provide comfort to the soul, achieving exactly the objective that was set out when the gardens were created between 1906 and 1910.

Devised by Colonel William Hall Walker, a wealthy Scotsman from a famous brewing family, the gardens were laid out by Japanese master horticulturist Tassa Eida and his son Minoru. Their aim was, through trees, plants, flowers, lawns, rocks and water, to symbolise the "Life of Man". That plan was executed to perfection and Eida's legacy is now admired by the 150,000 visitors who soak up the peace of the gardens every year.

Very much representative of Japanese gardens from the early 20th century, Eida's work traces the journey of a soul from oblivion to eternity and portrays the human experience of its embodiment as it journeys by paths of its own choice through life. Birth, childhood, marriage, parenthood, old age, death and the afterlife are all brought to mind as the gardens, a seamless mixture of Eastern and Western cultures, are explored.

Eida left Tully in 1912 with 34 years passing before the gardens gained their next supervisor, Patrick Doyle, who remained in charge until 1972, since when the gardens have continued to flourish and surge in popularity.

Among the most loved of all Ireland's gardens, the Irish National Stud's Japanese Gardens are a veritable feast for the eye and ear with the sight and sound of trickling streams perfectly complementing the greenery and vivid colours that provide a tranquil backdrop to the beautiful Bridge of Life and Tea House.

The Japanese Gardens are a place for contemplation, meditation and reflection. Since they were first enjoyed more than 100 years ago, they have never failed to please.