Irish National Stud

Visitors - Attractions

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Latest News & Events

  • Irish National Stud launch Breeding & Racing Club10/11/2014If you have ever dreamed of having your colours carried to victory or have wanted to get involved in breeding a racehorse the Irish National Stud’s new Breeding and Racing Club is for you!

  • Stallion Fees 201531/10/2014

  • Charm Champion in QEII20/10/2014Charm Spirit was a ready winner of the QEII Stakes at Ascot at last Saturday’s Champions Weekend. He broke well from the stalls and was settled on the heels of the leaders under jockey Olivier Peslier. The field was brought along by the distinctive Top Notch Tonto but when things got serious two furlongs from home Charm Spirit was travelling with great purpose under a relaxed Peslier.

St. Fiachra's Garden

How can something so new transport us back to a time that none of us knew?  Step into St. Fiachra's Garden and enter another world, one to which you will wish to return again and again.

The garden, designed in 1999 by award-winning landscape architect Professor Martin Hallinan and named to commemorate St. Fiachra, the patron saint of gardeners, provides a perfect partner to the Irish National Stud's Japanese Gardens while, at the same time, opening up a wholly different yet equally satisfying experience.

This stunning attraction seeks to capture that which inspired those involved in Ireland's monastic movement in the 6th and 7th centuries.  It does so principally by paying handsome tribute to the Irish landscape in its rawest state.  Rock and water are rulers in a garden rejoicing in the natural beauty of woodland, wetland, waterfalls, lakes and streams.

Many school children enjoy taking part in a nature trail through this garden identifying trees, learning about swan life, the food web and the ages of trees.

Monastic cells of fissured limestone are surrounded by water while an inner subterranean garden is home to magnificent Waterford Crystal-shaped rocks, ferns and orchids.

St. Fiachra's Garden is the very essence of Ireland's natural beauty, as it was then and as it is now. A tribute to an Irish saint, it is also a fitting tribute to Ireland herself.