Irish National Stud

Visitors - Attractions

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Latest News & Events

  • Irish National Stud launch Breeding & Racing Club10/11/2014If you have ever dreamed of having your colours carried to victory or have wanted to get involved in breeding a racehorse the Irish National Stud’s new Breeding and Racing Club is for you!

  • Stallion Fees 201531/10/2014

  • Charm Champion in QEII20/10/2014Charm Spirit was a ready winner of the QEII Stakes at Ascot at last Saturday’s Champions Weekend. He broke well from the stalls and was settled on the heels of the leaders under jockey Olivier Peslier. The field was brought along by the distinctive Top Notch Tonto but when things got serious two furlongs from home Charm Spirit was travelling with great purpose under a relaxed Peslier.

Stud Farm

Racehorses are conceived, born and raised on Tully's famous stud farm, which has long been and continues to be the source of thoroughbred champions.

Stars of the show on the stud farm are the eight stallions, whose performances on the track as racehorses have enabled them to spend the years of their retirement living a life that many would envy. Some of racing's most successful and regally-bred mares are sent to Tully to be covered by the stallions, the outcome of their encounters being the foals who never fail to enthral visitors.

The farm, purchased by Colonel William Hall Walker at the turn of the 20th century, is now owned by the Irish people but is run as a commercial entity, its management working hard to maintain its competitiveness in a major global industry in which Ireland has long played a leading role alongside Britain, France, the USA and Australia.

Sea The Stars, horse of the year in 2009, is among the champions to have been born and raised on the Tully land, on which King Edward VII's Minoru spent the early part of a life that peaked when he won the Epsom Derby exactly 100 years before Sea The Stars triumphed in the very same race.

Sun Chariot, also born and bred at the Irish National Stud, became one of the very few horses ever to complete the fillies' Triple Crown when mopping up the 1942 1,000 Guineas, Oaks and St. Leger for King George VI.  Almost seven decades later, in May 2011, his daughter, Queen Elizabeth II, visited the farm, once again highlighting that the Irish National Stud's importance stretches far beyond the confines of Ireland.